How to Hang a Deer Feeder

How to Hang a Deer Feeder

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Hunting deer is alway fun but a tricky activity. Unlike the traditional ways of hunting which involves going to the forest with a bow and arrow, nowadays hunting deer is done differently. Among the many approaches to hunt deer is hanging deer feeders.

You must be wondering:

Why would someone hang a deer feeder anyway?

Hanging a deer feeder, on the other hand, is a clever and easy way of inviting hungry deer to catch a snack, particularly during times when food is scarce. It is no secret that deer are very paranoid and sensitive species, and it is difficult to capture and retain them in a single location for hours. They are not stupid. They are well aware that you are up to something. Many times, you will see them walk by a deer feeder and then disappear into the wild.

So,

When you hang a device on a tree and put some meal on it, there is a possibility that it will attract not only deer but also other animals that might be around the area. During winter seasons, when food is scarce, deers do come looking for food almost everywhere possible. It is then, during such seasons that they will become frequent visitors to your feeder in search for food.

This article therefore focuses on instilling some knowledge on how you can perfectly hang your deer feeder at the right spot.

Now,

Items Needed to Hang a deer Feeder

  1. Drilling machinery
  2. Measuring tape
  3. Small diameter drill bit
  4. 2” long screw with O-ring
  5. Durable rope
  6. Durable carabiner
  7. Old hose
  8. Scissors

How to hang a deer feeder

To begin with, take a marker, identify the middle of the feeder and mark it with a pen or marker. On that very spot you marked, drill a small hole. Next, insert the O-ring long screw into the hole as deep as it can go. Try as much as possible to avoid breaking wood as you do this.

The next step is to select the best suitable location to practice hanging your deer feeder. The most preferred location is a place with many trees and a lot of thicket or bushes. If you are going to hang it between two trees, then you need to make sure that both have the same diameter. For accuracy, you can consider calculating the distance between the two trees with a measuring tape.

Now, take your heavy duty rope, find its center point and begin coiling it with a string carabiner. Once you are done, take your carabiner and tie the overhand knot around it. As you do that, ensure you are holding both ends of the rope. Now take one end of the rope and cross it over the other so that the left end of your rope is at the right and the opposite is true.

Once that is done, then get a small piece of hose that has  a length  equal to the diameter of every trunk. In order to encircle the entire trunk, the hose ought to be at least twice the length of the trunk. The idea is to have the hose be longer to cover the trunk. Once that is set, now take the rope and pass the thread through its edge. The purpose of the hose is to merely protect the tree from potential external injury.

Now take the rope and place it in between the tree branches, making sure that the carabiner is always at the center no matter what. Take one end of the rope and encircle it on one of the trees.

Using a simple square knot, take the rop and hose and tie them together around the trunk. Do the same for the other tree.

Finally, take the O-ring screw and gently connect it right above the feeder to the center of the rope’s cariber. That way, you will have easy work removing the feeder in case you want to refill or wash.

Now that you know how to hang a feeder, let’s now take a look at the perfect locations to place your deer feeders.

Where To Place Deer Feeders?

Deer can live in a variety of habitats. Some can flourish in wetlands and woodland, while others thrive in mountains and savanna areas. Because of the overabundance of human culture and consequent expansion into the wild, deer can now become more at ease in urban environments.

So, where should you place your feeder?

One thing you first need to consider is the presence of the forest. How far is the forest from where you place your feeder? It will be ridiculous to try and hang your feeder in between two lonely trees that are far away from nearby forest. Being sensitive, deer cannot dare to go anywhere they feel they will not be safe. Placing a feeder at the center of wide open land will obviously be a complete waste of time. However, when you place your feeder in a little opening just near a bush, then you will be in a good position to attract a good number of deer.

If you are good at deer tracking then identifying their favorite places is easier for you. Tracking entails reading their footprints to find out the direction where they are coming from and possibly where they are going. By tracking and reading their tracks you can identify their common spot and roads, and there you can set up your feeder.

To make the deer get used to your feeder, always refill on a regular basis. Once they become accustomed to it, move it to a slightly different location of your choice but still in the same place. Deer will be eager to search for it in case they do not find it in the common spot. That way, you can tactically draw them slowly to the perfect place you want to be catching them.

CONCLUSION

Deer are believed to be social creatures. They are most likely to be seen walking in groups. They belong to the herbivore tribe, but they only eat vegetation. Their diet is limited to hay, leaves, and small shrubs.

To capture deer by feeding them, you would need to set up a feeder in the forest with meals made up of a variety of vegetables. Setting up the feeder in the proper place, as discussed in the post, improves your chances of catching them.

Up until this point, we sure hope that this article has been helpful in giving you insights on how and where to hang your deer feeder. Good luck!

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